How to Use the Linux lsof Command

Key Takeaways

  • Linux simplifies handling a wide range of different resources by treating devices that adopt or produce byte streams as files.
  • The lsof command can be used to list open files in the system, including processes and devices treated as files.
  • lsof can be used to explore for files opened by specific processes, directories, users, ports, and protocols, providing detailed information about each file.


If everything in Linux is a file, there has to be more to it than just files on your hard drive. This tutorial will show you how to use lsof to see all the other devices and processes that are being handled as files.


On Linux, Everything Is a File

The oft-quoted phrase that everything in Linux is a file is sort of true. A file is a collection of bytes. When they are being read into a program or sent to a printer, they appear to produce a stream of bytes. When they are being written to, they adopt a stream of bytes.

Many other system components adopt or produce streams of bytes, such as keyboards, socket connections, printers, and communication processes. Because they either adopt, produce, or adopt and produce byte streams, these devices can be handle—at a very low level—as though they were files.

This design concept simplified the implementation of the Unix operating system. It meant that a small set of handlers, tools, and APIs could be created to handle a wide range of different resources.

The data and program files that live on your hard disk are plain old filesystem files. We can use the ls command to list them and find out some details about them.

How do we find out about all the other processes and devices that are being treated as though they were files? We use the lsof command. This lists the open files in the system. That is, it lists anything that is being handled as though it were a file.

The lsof Command

Many of the processes or devices that lsof can report on belong to root or were launched by root, so you will need to use the sudo command with lsof.

And because this listing will be very long, we are going to pipe it through less, too.

sudo lsof | less

lsof in a terminal window

Before the lsof output appears GNOME users may see a warning message in the terminal window.

 lsof: WARNING: can't stat() fuse.gvfsd-fuse file system /run/user/1000/gvfs
Output information may be incomplete.

lsof tries to process all mounted filesystems. This warning message is raised because lsof has encountered a GNOME Virtual file system (GVFS). This is a special case of a filesystem in user space (FUSE). It acts as a bridge between GNOME, its APIs and the kernel. No one—not even root—can access one of these file systems, apart from the owner who mounted it (in this case, GNOME). You can ignore this warning.

The output from lsof is very wide. The leftmost columns are:

the leftmost columns of lsof output in a terminal window

The rightmost columns are:

the righttmost columns of lsof output in a terminal window

The lsof Columns

All columns do not apply to every type of open file. It is normal for some of them to be blank.

  • Command: The name of the command associated with the process that opened the file.
  • PID: Process Identification number of the process that opened the file.
  • TID: Task (thread) Identification number. A blank column means it is not a task; it is a process.
  • User: User ID or name of the user to whom the process belongs, or the user ID or login of the person that owns the directory in /proc where lsof finds information about the process.
  • FD: Shows the file descriptor of the file. File descriptors are described below.
  • Type: type of node associated with the file. Note types are described below.
  • Device: Contains either the device numbers, separated by commas, for a character special, block special, regular, directory or NFS file, or a kernel reference address that identifies the file. It might also show the base address or device name of a Linux AX.25 socket device.
  • Size/Off: Shows the size of the file or the file offset in bytes.
  • Node: Shows the node number of a local file, or the inode number of an NFS file in the server host, or internet protocol type. It might display STR for a stream or the IRQ or inode number of a Linux AX.25 socket device.
  • Name: Shows the name of the mount point and file system on which the file resides.

The FD Column

The file descriptor in the FD column can be one of many options; the man page list them all.

The FD column entry can be made up of three parts: a file descriptor, a mode character, and a lock character. Some common file descriptors are:

  • cwd: Current working directory.
  • err: FD information error (see NAME column).
  • ltx: Shared library text (code and data).
  • m86: DOS Merge mapped file.
  • mem: Memory-mapped file.
  • mmap: Memory-mapped device.
  • pd: Parent directory.
  • rtd: Root directory.
  • txt: Program text (code and data)
  • A number, representing a file descriptor.

The mode character can be one of the following:

  • r: Read access.
  • w: Write access.
  • u: Read and Write access.
  • ‘ ‘: A space character, if the mode is unknown and there is no lock character.
  • -: Mode unknown and there is a lock character.

The lock character can be one of:

  • r: Read lock on part of the file.
  • R: Read lock on the entire file.
  • w: Write lock on part of the file.
  • W: Write lock on the entire file.
  • u: Read and write lock of any length.
  • U: Unknown lock type.
  • ‘ ‘: A space character. No lock.

The TYPE Column

There are over 70 entries that might appear in the TYPE column. Some common entries you will see are:

  • REG: Regular filesystem file.
  • DIR: Directory.
  • FIFO: First In First Out.
  • CHR: Character special file.
  • BLK: Block special file.
  • INET: Internet socket.
  • unix: UNIX domain socket

See Processes That Have Opened a File

To see the processes that have opened a certain file, furnish the name of the file as a parameter to lsof. For example, to see the processes that have opened kern.log file, use this command:

sudo lsof /var/log/kern.log

sudo lsof /var/log/kern.log in a terminal window

lsof responds by displaying the single process, rsyslogd which was started by the user syslog.

lsof output in a terminal window

See All Files Opened from a Directory

To see the files that have been opened from a directory, and the processes that opened them, pass the directory to lsof as a parameter. You must use the +D (directory) option.

To see all the files that are open in the /var/log/ directory, use this command:

sudo lsof +D /var/log/

sudo lsof +D /var/log/ in a terminal window

lsof responds with a list of all the open files in that directory.

lsof output in a terminal window

To see all the files that have been opened from the /home directory, use the following command:

sudo lsof +D /home

Running

The files have been opened from the /home directory are displayed. Note that with shorter descriptions in some of the columns, the whole listing is narrower.

Files opened in the /home directory.

List Files Opened By a Process

To see the files that have been opened by a particular process, use the -c (command) option. Note that you can furnish more than one explore term to lsof at once.

sudo lsof -c ssh -c init

Checking the files opened by the SSH process.

lsof provides a list of the files that have been opened by either of the processes provided on the command line.

The files opened by the SSH process.

See Files Opened By a User

To limit the display to the files that have been opened by a specific user, use the -u (user) option. In this example, we’ll look at the files that have been opened by processes that are owned or launched on behalf of Mary.

sudo lsof -u mary

Listing the files opened by the user Mary.

All of the files listed have been opened on behalf of the user Mary. This includes files that have been opened by the desktop environment, for example, or simply as a result of Mary having logged in.

A complete list of files opened by the Mary user.

Excluding FIles Opened by a User

To exclude the files that have been opened by a user, use the ^ operator. Excluding users from the listing makes it easier to find the information you are interested in. You must use the -u option as before, and add the ^ character to the start of the user’s name.

sudo lsof +D /home -u ^mary

List all of the files opened in /home, except those opened by Mary.

This time, the listing for the /home directory does not include any of the files that have been opened by the user Mary.

A reduced list of files in /home that have been opened.

List FIles Opened by a Process

To list the files that have been opened by a specific process, use the -p (process) option and furnish the process ID as a parameter.

sudo lsof - p 4610

Checking files opened by a specific process. In this example, process 4610.

All of the files that have been opened by the process ID you furnish are listed for you.

A list of files opened by the specified process.

Listing Process IDs That Have Opened a FIle

To see the process IDs for the processes that have opened a particular file, use the -t (terse) option and furnish the name of the file on the command line.

sudo lsof -t /usr/share/mime/mime.cache

Using lsof to view a list of processes that have accessed a specific file.

The process IDs are displayed in a simple list.

The list of process IDs that have opened the mime.cache file.

Use AND and OR Searches

Let’s list the files that have been opened by user Mary, that are related to the SSH processes. We know we can furnish more than one explore item on the command line, so this should be easy.

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh in a terminal window

Now let’s look at the output from lsof. That doesn’t look right; there are entries in the output that were started by root.

lsof output in a terminal window

That isn’t what we expected. What happened?

When you furnish multiple explore terms lsof will return any file that matches the first explore term or the second explore term, and so on. In other words, it performs an OR explore.

To make lsof perform an AND explore, use the -a (and) option. This means the only files that will be listed will be ones that match the first explore term, and the second explore term, and so on.

Let’s try that again and use the -a option.

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh -a

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh -a in a terminal window

Now every file in the listing is one that has been opened by or on behalf of Mary, and are associated with the SSH command.

lsof output in a terminal window

Automatically Refreshing The Display

We can use the +|-r (repeat) option to put lsof into repeat mode. The repeat option can be applied in two ways, either +r or -r. We must also add the number of seconds we want lsof to expect before refreshing the display.

Using the repeat option in either format makes lsof display the results as usual, but it adds a dashed line to the bottom of the display. It waits for the number of seconds provided on the command line and then refreshes the display with a new set of results.

With the -r option this will continue until you press Ctrl+C. With the +r format, it will continue until there are no results to display, or until you press Ctrl+C.

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh -a -r5

sudo lsof -u mary -c ssh -a -r5 in a terminal window

Note the dashed line at the bottom of the listing. This separates each new display of data when the output is refreshed.

the righttmost columns of lsof output in a terminal window

Displaying Files Associated with Internet Connections

The -i (internet) option allows you to see the files opened by processes associated with network and internet connections.

lsof -i

Running

All of the files opened by network and internet connections are displayed.

The output of

Displaying Files Associated with Internet Connections by Process ID

To see the files opened by internet connections that are associated with a specific process ID, add the -p option and the -a option.

Here we are looking for files opened by an internet or network connection, by a process with an ID of 606.

sudo lsof -i -a -p 606

We have narrowed our search to only internet connections with a process ID of 606.

All of the files opened by process ID 606 that are associated with internet or network connections are displayed.

Every file associated with an Internet connection that has been opened by process 606.

Displaying Files Associated with Internet Connections and Commands

We can use the -c (command) option to look for files opened by specific processes. To look for files that have been opened by internet or network connections associated with the ssh process, use the following command:

lsof -i -a -c ssh

Searching for files associated with the SSH process.

All of the files opened due to the ssh processes are listed in the output.

Files associated with the SSH process.

Displaying Files Associated with Internet Connections and Ports

We can make lsof report on the files that were opened by internet or network connections on a specific port. To do this, we use the : character followed by the port number.

Here we’re asking lsof to list the files that have been opened by network or internet connections using port 22.

lsof -i :22

List associations between file access and a given port.

All of the listed files were opened by processes associated with port 22 (which is the default port for SSH connections).

List of files accessed by a process using port 22.

Displaying Files Associated with Internet Connections and Protocols

We can ask lsof to show the files that have been opened by processes associated with network and internet connections, that are using a specific protocol. We can select from TCP, UDP, and SMTP. Let’s use the TCP protocol and see what we get.

sudo lsof -i tcp

List files accessed via the TCP protocol.

The only files listed are those opened by processes that are using the TCP protocol.

A list of applications that have accessed files from the Internet using the TCP protocol.

We’ve Only Scratched the Surface

That’s a good grounding in some common use cases for lsof, but there is a lot more to it than that. Just how much more can be judged by the fact the man page is over 2,800 lines long.

The lsof command can be used to drill ever deeper into the strata of open files and pseudo-files. We’ve provided a sketch map; the atlas is in the man page.

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